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Hello newbie here!

Discussion in 'Welcome Newbies' started by Timor, 3 Mar 2015.

  1. Timor

    Timor Thread Starter New Member

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    Hi all :happy1:
    So guys, I'm new here and looking for advice. I'm planning on having a 4 week TEFL course in Chiang Mai, 25 May - 19 June and was wondering how hard will it be finding a teaching position end of June. I know it's not the best time of the year to apply for jobs (couple of months too late I guess). I'm a non NES with a bachelor's degree in Business Economics, and it will be my first trip to Thailand!!! How bad is the market in and around CM that time of the year generally speaking? I wouldn't mind working in a small town, I do like it quiet :smile:
    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    :welcome to TT
     
  3. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    Not too hard. Language centers are always hiring, and by June there will invariably be some turnover at government schools. There are a few members here from CM, hopefully they'll pop by and say hello.

    Oh, and welcome!
     
  4. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    welcome, good luck with the course and search. Facebook has many sites with a constant stream of available jobs
     
  5. Mister T

    Mister T Retired, fat and happy

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    Welcome newbie, you will most likely make a few contacts from the course. Pick and choose carefully with contracts, do not accept 10 or 11 month contracts.
     
  6. Timor

    Timor Thread Starter New Member

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    Hey guys, thanks for the warm welcome :thai wai: There's something more I'd like you to please help me. I'll be coming to Thailand with my travel medical insurance, let's say I get a teaching contract, will I be then double insured? Is it a problem? I want a good covering. I'm not over the hill but being alone so far away isn't the greatest feeling. Or is it :smile2:
     
  7. Mister T

    Mister T Retired, fat and happy

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    If you plan on staying a while, get a good annual cover. Many schools do not offer it, the school covers on offer are fairly minimal.
     
  8. Fatty

    Fatty Member

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    This.

    It basically means that you won't be paid during the long (2-3months) summer holiday from late Feb to early/mid May. You need a 12 month contract. Some schools give you fully paid holidays (the best deal) and some give you unpaid leave (but give the option of coming in for summer school to earn money and also give you two or three weeks paid holiday). That is also not an awful option for a newbie.

    However, 10 or 11 month contracts with no summer school should be avoided like the plague. The rules keep changing from one week to the next, but it 'appears' that you may only be able to stay for about 4 years (if you don't change schools). There are ways around that, but educational qulaifications make things much easier. You need a degree in education or a post grad in education to make things easier if you fancy staying longer.

    Don't worry, you can do a PGCEi (distance learning) and some M.Eds are availabe via distance learning or even within Thailand. The new regs seem to be saying that doing some Thainess course will do, but that is all up in the air. The word I've been getting from Thailand (school owner) is that a degree or post grad in Education will be needed for long term teaching stays. It does seem the case.

    Just giving you the heads up. But you'll be good for a few years anyway.

    You should also be looking for at least 40k pcm (baht of course!). Maybe 35k at a push (for a first job). Non degreed chaps take less (and run awful risks with visas and permits for teaching illegally). You're not in that boat so don't entertain this 30k nonsense (unless you really, really want to live in Chiang Mai or Phuket).

    Last tip? Avoid language centres (for full-time work). Gov schools pay poorly and have about 50 kids per class. A tough gig and most gigs are poorly paid, although many give you fully paid holidays for about 3 months of the year. A good private school will probably be your best option, although you might find a few universities may be interested in you (Business English etc). They pay isn't great at unis, but the hours are good (perhaps 2 or 3 per day) and many unis can supply you with extra work if you're good (business seminars etc). A dude I know out in Thailand (now retired) earned about 26k basic (baht pcm) but about an extra 50k per month on extra work the uni sent him on (he got his travelling/hotel expenses paid too). He was experienced though and it took a few years to build that up. Make sure your school pay for your visa and work permit too (and arrange it all for you). That's a big one.


    Good luck!
     
  9. Timor

    Timor Thread Starter New Member

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    I will have a good annual cover from my own country which is renewable year by year. I don't want to be in a thai public hospital if something serious happens. I guess that covers offered by the schools are just for the public hospitals. How do I manage this? May I just keep my own country insurance running togheter with the school one? And choose to be treated by the former if I break a leg for example? Anyone with similar experience?
    Cheers :smile:

    - - - Updated - - -

    Fatty, thank you so much for taking the time on writing your very informative post :cool:
     
  10. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    Why? have you ever been in one?

    Thailand has some very good public hospitals and, in turn, some very bad private ones.
     
  11. Timor

    Timor Thread Starter New Member

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    No, never been, but I got your point.
     
  12. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    Here is a short list of things I have heard at private hospitals in Thailand:

    * Bronchitis is a mild form of pnuemonia
    * If your daughter has never been diagnosed with asthma, she can't have it
    Upon seeing my daughter's bifid uvula:
    * Birth defects occur when Thais have children with foreigners (translated from Thai to English)
    * Look her chicken tongue has two eggs (again Thai to English)

    Also after an annual physical a doctor told me I could not eat meat, poultry, dairy, sodium, nuts, certain fruits (i.e. coconuts) and so on. I figure I'm good with veggies, sugar, booze and tobacco.
    Same doctor told me I had mild fatty liver due to weight gain (My weight was down 4.6 kg from a check-up 20 months prior).
    Same doctor told me I have an enlarged heart, I asked what I should do about it, he said 'nothing, it is perfectly normal'.
     
  13. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

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    Not being a hardass but after re-reading my post thought I'd add details.

    A few on this forum have been here many years and have reason to value the level of care given to us or our loved ones at public hospitals.

    :smile:
     

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