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Marriage Certificate documents (getting married)?

Discussion in 'Residing in Thailand' started by Garden, 16 Jul 2016.

  1. Garden

    Garden Thread Starter Much ado about nothing

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    I am beginning the process of legally marrying my longtime Thai spouse. We have been together for 10+ years and we just want to get our papers in order. What documents do we need to bring to the Amphoe?
    Does there exist a list of required documents? You've got a link?

    I tried to Google it, but it is all rather confusing with all the Thai words and legal stuff I am not familiar with.
    What was your experience with all the docs?

    Thanks,
    Heiko
     
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  2. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    To be honest, never found any documentation either but besides proper identification, you need the confirmation from your country/ embassy that states your marital status and your eligibility to marry. Those documents have to be translated and certified by the Thai MFA.

    That's about it in regards to documents.

    Go to the district office of your choice and get married.
     
  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Sincere apologise !!!!! I forgot.

    CONGRATULATIONS with your plans.
     
  4. SundayJam

    SundayJam Well-Known Member

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    I'm gonna apply for a marriage visa next month. These are the requirements sent to me by a colleague who has successfully applied twice for a year visa:

    - TM7 application form & photo printed on both sides of an A4 sheet.
    - B1,900 fee
    - Passport & Arrival Card (TM6)
    - Signed copy of passport & TM6 & all pages with reference to Thai stamps and visas
    - Marriage certificate and Registrar's certificate (Kor Ror 2 & 3)
    Note: you already have the Kor Ror 3, it’s your main marriage license, just make a copy.
    For the Kor Ror 2, you can’t use the copies they gave you when you got married because they are “too old” so you need to get a new one. Your wife can go to any Amphur and ask for it. It’s easy.
    - Signed copy of marriage cert and Registrar's cert (Kor Ror 2 & 3)
    - Tabien Baan aka “blue book” of the wife.
    - Signed copy of Tabien Baan
    - Signed copy of wife’s ID card (and bring the original).
    - Bank letter on account balance, dated maximum 7 days. The fee is 200baht at my bank, SCB. You must have at least 400,000 baht in your Thai bank account for at least 3 months before you apply. It should not go below that amount in that time. *
    - Bank Savings book updated the day of application (it’s a must)
    - Signed copy of Bank savings book (all pages, including the one updated on the day of the application)
    - Proof of home:

    - In a home you own: bring the Tabien Baan (blue book) with your home address on it, the same one you use on the application form TM7 above. Also bring a signed copy of the home’s Tabien Baan.

    - In a rented apartment: you need a signed copy of the building owner’s Tabien Baan (blue book), which will have your building’s address on it, the same one you use on the application form TM7. You also must have a signed copy of the owner’s ID card. Finally, you need to bring the original rental contract and a signed copy. If you don’t have such a contract with you, ask at your building: they’ll give you one.

    - Signed map of address (draw direction to house on an A4 or printout something from Google maps)
    - 4 photos showing the couple in their home and outside of their home.
    If it’s a house, 1 photo must be outside the house with the house number visible.
    If it’s an apartment, 1 photo must be outside the building showing the building number if any, and 1 photo must be right outside the apartment with the apartment door and the number clearly visible.
    - Stick the photos on 2 A4 sheets, 2 photos per sheet (can’t be 3 on 1 sheet).

    *For a first time application it's 2 months + 2 weeks...because you need to apply for a visa 2 weeks before your prior visa expires.
     
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  5. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    :worthless

    First off, congrats!

    Secondly, as Stamp has said, you need a certificate of marriageability (and that has to be translated to Thai by an authorized translation service - these services are easy to find outside the embassies and consulates in Chiang Mai and Bangkok - and they will likely offer you the option of having them sent by EMS to you if you don't want to wait until the next day to pick it up).

    I don't recall what s required of the Thai spouse, but that I am sure a google check (in thai) would yield the appropriate results. when I got married, we didn't realize we were expected to each have a witness, so in true Thai mai pen rai fashion the witnesses were amphoe staff. I was completely shocked at how easy it was. The longest part of the process was waiting for the docs to be translated (also the most expensive).
     
  6. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    You can print off the example eligibility to marry form from the internet and just fill in the relevant info. Then get it translated and you're off. I dont recall the mrs needing anything..id card? Certainly for the divorce she didn't. You'll need 2 witnesses, and here's where you're laughing..the mocy taxi nearest the amphur will be well used to witnessing so give them a shout, 100b for each of them. They'll need to copy their id cards as well.
     
  7. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    Yeah you'll need a certificate of freedom to marry, basically an affidavit sworn at your embassy in which you state you are not married and are free to marry. If I remember mine stated details of my work and earnings. Then you need to get it translated into Thai by an official translator, officially stamped by the translator, then legalised at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs which for me involved a hike to Laksi in the north of Bangkok; you can pay extra for 'express' service, basically same day. Depending on your nationality there are templates available online for your affidavit. If I recall it all adds up to a tidy little sum.

    Last but not least, congratulations!
     
  8. Tonyja

    Tonyja Well-Known Member

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    The translator i used in Silom charged 1000 baht for the affidavit and the legalization. I remember the guy was on about 8 year overstay. This was back in 2007 though. Useless then Tony.
     
  9. Ajarn Greg

    Ajarn Greg Well-Known Member

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    For sure you need to contact your Embassy, (Consulate to be more accurate), to provide you with the legal papers about yourself. I hope that you will be lucky enough to have a consulate that can issue the papers from here and you will not need a travel back to your country as I did. Usually these certificates are issued in English and you need to get a certified translation in Thai. That means that your District offices will not accept any translation. The paper needs to be certified from the MFA office which is at the Chaeng Wattana government building. Your wife needs to collect some papers too. After the marriage on the district office you will need to register your marriage the Registrar's Office, and again translate the Thai paper in English with a certified translation, (your country's consulate will insist on it), at MFA. You will submit the translated paper to the consulate and you will be legally married also in your country.
     
  10. po3try

    po3try Well-Known Member

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    i remember it being a pain in the ass.
     
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  11. SundayJam

    SundayJam Well-Known Member

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    As I recall, I had to go to the US embassy to swear that I was divorced and single...something like that.
     
  12. chuachinsoon

    chuachinsoon Well-Known Member

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    Huh. You're lucky. I had to go back to Malaysia and find a lawyer or Justice of Peace to sign a document saying that I was single and was not a criminal... and than get the Thai embassy to affirm that that was true. The stamps were expensive. The travelling around Malaysia even more so. :(
     
  13. Ajarn Greg

    Ajarn Greg Well-Known Member

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    You went to Malaysia and complain for travel costs... I had to fly to Greece and spent one month there to do the paper work.
     
  14. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Didn't have to go home. My brother applied for some needed papers at home and sent them over. Together with some other documents of both me and of my-wife-to-be, the 'Certificate of the capacity to contract marriage' was granted by my Embassy.
     
  15. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    I was about to have a moan that it cost 400 thb to be translated and an additional 100 for the EMS. the amphoe was another 150ish baht - the witness signatures were free as they worked there.
     

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