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Moonlighting and Taxes

Discussion in 'Tax issues' started by crew, 18 Jun 2012.

  1. crew

    crew Thread Starter Faber College Member

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    Around the world, working part-time at a language center in an effort to earn extra cash on top of a full-time teaching salary is common amongst teachers and Thailand is no exception.

    The full-time gigs are typically legal and paying taxes is to be be expected. Yet the part-time work is often...erm..ugh...let's just say, assumed-to-be-legal. Surely the language center's address is the same as that of the school associated with the teacher's work permit, chai mai?

    Anywhooo, it's an easy bet that the language centers are taking out tax. Typically 3-5%...from what I've heard at least. Now, if for some reason the language center hasn't managed to complete an application for a work permit...coughs, clears throat...and therefore start recording income in association with a tax number, how does the language center justify taking out one's "taxes"?

    :innocent:
     
  2. magnumforce

    magnumforce Active Member

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    If they haven't taken the time to legally employ you by either adding their school to your 'real' school on the work permit or by getting you a new permit, I would refuse to pay tax. I would also, insist on this as there are penalties in place for both you and the language school for breaking the law.
     
    ramses likes this.
  3. crew

    crew Thread Starter Faber College Member

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    of course this is the ideal play but what about those who don't feel comfortable telling their employer that they refuse to pay?

    of course this is always a risk but we also know there are literally thousands of teachers working in these situations without a work permit in conjunction with part-time employers.

    what are teachers to do when reality so rarely coincides with governmental regulations and company policies?
     
  4. ramses

    ramses Well-Known Member

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    Go to city hall or the revenue department, get a Tax ID issued to you, file taxes on or before the tax deadline. Most teachers I know get a very high percent of their tax back at the end of the year. When you file the return requesting a refund, it will (as it should) raise red flags everywhere at the revenue department. When you show that you have been paying tax that the revenue department has not received there will be questions to answer.

    As a heads up, one should have the CV up to date, and be willing to look for work fairly quickly after the revenue department goes after the company you work for. If someone were to get let go because they filed a tax return on money that was remitted to the revenue department, they should go to the labour office the same day to file a claim for severance.

    Companies can and do operate outside the law, and until the staff at these companies take matters into their own hands, little will change. There is always recourse when you have been wronged.

    Two things I would not worry about in this case. First, I do not think the revenue department is on the take for companies that do not give WP and Tax ID to their employees, so one should not worry too much about being given the run around from them. Also, don't worry about your employer badmouthing you for what you have done and affecting your ability to work elsewhere. Language companies compete with each other both for clients and for talent. If you are switched on enough to get your company into trouble for operating outside the law, you are likely to be switched on enough to be an asset to the competition.

    Just my thoughts...
     
  5. magnumforce

    magnumforce Active Member

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    Well, two options really. One can either (a) Harden the f**k up, as they say in Australia :attack:, or (b) bend over more so they can continue taking advantage of you.

    If you point out that you are not ignorant of the law and that you are very concerned about working illegally as you have family here etc, then there should be no reason for them not to want to make you legal, especially if you are a good teacher and an asset to their company. If they go in the opposite direction and start to make life difficult for you, then leave and make a call to the local Labour Office to report them. Plenty more language schools around.
     
  6. crew

    crew Thread Starter Faber College Member

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    for the record: i don't teach in language schools other than the training center i work for. i'm simply trying to explore the issue for any interested parties.
     
  7. Ajarn

    Ajarn New Member

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    I agree with magnumforce. Having a good clean record and good professional intentions can go a long way with officials.
     
  8. Rastus

    Rastus Well-Known Member

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    You could politely tell the language centre that you wish to pay the tax yourself. You do not have to pay it weekly or monthly. Once a year (before the deadline - the last day of March) is acceptable.

    For some people, paying tax yourself is better as from my experience educational institutions don't take into account your family circumstances (or even ask you if you wish to claim for any tax allowances/exemptions). See here for details of allowances: ::Personal Income Tax::
     

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