1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

South African teachers in Thailand, not native speakers of English?

Discussion in 'Welcome Newbies' started by Zhandivz, 28 Apr 2015.

  1. Zhandivz

    Zhandivz Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    23 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi

    I'm doing a study on South African teachers in Thailand. I have heard that SA teachers are not considered as native speakers of English. Anyone encountered this as a practical reality while teaching in Thailand?



    Fine print: responses to this thread will be used anonymously for research purposes.
     
  2. Makaveli

    Makaveli aka 2Pac Staff Member

    Joined:
    26 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    3,973
    Likes Received:
    233
    The teachers council of Thailand don't recognize them as native speakers
    As for schools for what they think, each to their own i guess
     
    Stamp likes this.
  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    26 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    9,687
    Likes Received:
    1,514
    Government, private and language schools (still) consider SA nationals as native speakers of English. However, The Teachers' Council of Thailand, responsible for teacher licensing and standards in K12 schools, doesn't. Therefor SA nationals must do a TOEIC or equivalent test when applying for a provisional teaching permit.
     
  4. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

    Joined:
    19 Oct 2011
    Messages:
    2,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    But as you are conducting a study into SA teachers you will probably understand the pitfalls. As you are aware Zhandiviz, SA has 11 official languages and this must confuse the hell out of Khuruspaha.

    Furthermore, as you already know in SA, not everyones first language is English thus this may give Khurusapha some grounds for excluding SA's as NES. I'm sure you have considered this in your study and therefore have probably answered some of your own questions as to why already.

    As for on the ground in Thailand, I work with 2 SA teachers, one perect English, one 90% as his first language is Afrikaans. Both good able teachers and welcomed at my school. However, I have heard that some schools do exclude them from teaching at their school, but I do believe that this is in the minority.

    FYI: The 'Irish' were also excluded not so long ago from the list of NES countries but after some high level shouting this oversight has been rectified LOL. You can find references to this here on Thailand Teaching (somewhere) to give you a bigger picture of this ...might be a useful example to refer to in your studies.
     
  5. Gor Blimey Guvnur!

    Gor Blimey Guvnur! What the duck ! Staff Member

    Joined:
    19 Oct 2011
    Messages:
    2,085
    Likes Received:
    577
    Zhandiviz: Came across this too. Surprised the % is as low as it is but this would give more reason not to make SA a NES country status ...don't you think?

    "According to South Africa's 2001 census, 23,8% of the population speaks IsiZulu, followed by the 17,6% who are Xhosa speakers. Only 8% of the population's mother tongue is English"

    South Africa's languages – Travel Tips – South African Tourism
     
  6. Zhandivz

    Zhandivz Thread Starter New Member

    Joined:
    23 Mar 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Do you think being subjected to having to prove your ability in English (when it is that ability you want to use and teach after all) has an impact on the teachers’ self-esteem/teaching confidence? @ GBG Or even on how they are perceived by their colleagues?

    (Thanks for the posts guys)
     
  7. gungchang

    gungchang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    16 Oct 2011
    Messages:
    2,891
    Likes Received:
    500
    wamukelekile
     
  8. bahn_farang

    bahn_farang Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    21 Feb 2011
    Messages:
    5,609
    Likes Received:
    668
    Look at the reverse. Don't you think the powers that be have some sort of duty to demand a high level of proficiency in the language that the teacher is teaching in? It's a 1500 baht Toeic test, not a 150 000 baht post grad they want.

    As for self-esteem, comes from one's heart not from the bs that those in-charge throw at you.
     
    Gor Blimey Guvnur! and Mister T like this.
  9. nicmunsami

    nicmunsami New Member

    Joined:
    6 Sep 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    I'm from South Africa and the only language I speak is English but I completely understand the reasoning behind taking a toeic test to prove our level of English, because South Africa has 11 official languages


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
    Stamp likes this.
  10. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

    Joined:
    26 Nov 2010
    Messages:
    9,687
    Likes Received:
    1,514
    :welcome2
     
  11. nicmunsami

    nicmunsami New Member

    Joined:
    6 Sep 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thank you


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     

Share This Page