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Speaking vs Grammar

Discussion in 'Teacher Licensing (TCT)' started by shorty0431, 11 May 2016.

  1. shorty0431

    shorty0431 Thread Starter New Member

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    Comments please. The sentence below was written by a Filipino in school for a play, although it is grammatically correct I find it hard to accept for someone to speak.

    In no great houses of this land does any young man knows the song.
     
  2. portnoy58

    portnoy58 Well-Known Member

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    This reads a bit like a troll. From personal experience, people tend to make more mistakes than normal when they write under pressure, like to meet a deadline as in scripting a play. It's a crap sentence but it is redolent of Philippine English. I always fall about in laughter when my mother-in-law or members of my wife's family say things like: "I'll be the one that goes ahead" etc; in this instance it is a polite way of excusing yourself if you leave a party early or retire early to bed. In the context of what I've seen NES and non-NES teachers churn out in English or content taught in English in Thai schools, it hardly registers on the Richter scale. I suggest you try to establish what your colleague really wants to say and offer a better alternative in as non-condescending a manner as possible. However if you do this incorrectly, you might open up a real can of worms, that is, if it hasn't already been opened. Personally, I wouldn't give it a moment's consideration and I would proceed with the crap - from my experience of plays and sketches, no one will be paying any attention to the spoken word.
     
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  3. SundayJam

    SundayJam Well-Known Member

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    In no great houses of this land (do?) does any man know the song.
    Does any man know the song in the great houses of this land?
    Every man knows the song in the great houses of this land.

    It's a fairly minor point of subject verb agreement.
     
  4. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    No young men in the great houses of this land know the song. :porky
     
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  5. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    In no great houses of this land does any young man knows the song. My reading =

    "In all ordinary houses of this land all young men know the song."

    Or: All ordinary men in this country know the ( this) song.

    Deeper meaning of it could be that the rich people might not see the trees when in the forest.

    P.S. It seems to be a sentence from a bible, or similar. I know some Pinnoys who want to "teach their religion" to young Thai students.
     
  6. sirchai

    sirchai Well-Known Member

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    Only the old men in the great houses of this land know the song, because the young men are too busy to update their farcebook page and listen to shitty music only. :smile
     

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