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Help Teaching science....

Discussion in 'Classroom' started by sirchai, 26 Jun 2016.

  1. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Sawasdee khrap,

    With all respect, but I do believe that the text and workbooks are way to difficult for our grade three kids.

    The science book, produced by "Pelangi Publishing" starts with Heredity. Here're some words of the second page: heredity, dimple, cell, gene, trait, genetic, characteristic, nucleus and it starts pretty rough.

    Even using a lot of time by teaching them the meaning of each word, they wouldn't know the Thai word for it.
    I'm sitting here, trying to write my lesson plans for a six hour teaching day and will have a student coming to my "office" after my sixth class to finalize her speech which she'll have to deliver on Tuesday.

    Can you think of other traits that are passed down through genes? ( One of the questions, the students should be able to answer on page three)

    I love to teach science but when the majority don't even know the words in Thai, what sense does it make to put all energy in lessons that would only be successful if the students would have the same level of English?

    But none had to take an entrance test, so there're kids who don't understand " Where do you live"?

    and a few who're a sort of good.

    How do others on this so honorable forum deal with such subjects?

    Any idea would be deeply appreciated. And thanks a lot in advance.
     
  2. ttompatz

    ttompatz Just another teacher

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    Instead of CBT think CLIL.
    Instead of one objective for the class there are 2 - an EFL objective and a content objective.
    Plan your lesson accordingly.
    As to knowing the stuff in Thai... nothing wrong with just learning new content in English.
    It is no different than a native speaking child learning new content words and concepts. Think "macro language" instead of 2 languages.
    Focus on what they can do and move forward with that rather than what they can't do.
    The kids and moms will be happy with the real progress instead of the fantasy of progress at completing the book and knowing nothing.
     
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  3. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    It's not always relevant to assume that things cannot be taught when the students have never learned the vocab in Thai before. A help might be to just try to make the students understand backwards.

    Assign your students a project. An A4 paper with recent pictures of father, mother and of the student. Give the students, if they're not that strong, the rubrics such as colour of the hair, colour of the skin, shape of the eyes, able to role the tongue and so on to build a matrix. Let them explore a real-life situation of exploration and comparison. When the project is done and submitted to you, explain your students about traits > father/ mother > heredity > cells > genes > nucleus.

    Hope this helps.

    I've been using the book for almost 6 years.
     
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  4. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    Thanks a lot for your post. I started to make a slideshow to make it easier for them. Yep, it does help a lot.

    Wish you a nice start of the week in ...a few hours. :thai wai
     
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  5. Stamp

    Stamp Administrator Staff Member

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    Still miss teaching primary EP. Did it from 2005 until 2012. :very sad
     
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  6. sirchai

    sirchai Thread Starter Well-Known Member

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    2005, exactly when I started teaching. Mate, I don't think that you'd be happy at my school.

    20 hours in the contract, in reality about 24, plus creating and checking homework and many other stuff that shouldn't be done by a teacher.

    There's absolutely no organisation and you're the curriculum, the computer technician, babysitter and after a while you forget what a pay rise looks like...

    I hope I'll survive until October, counting the days already............:go10
     

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